Case study on how collective curation informs strategic decisions

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Content curation is powerful for several endeavours – particularly to make better informed strategic decisions. Other objectives include visibility and education.

Decision making is hard!

We all know that taking decisions is hard: there are always uncertainties. Decisions cannot be purely rational or based on information because they are about projecting into a future. And that future hasn’t happened yet. This means that information can never be exhaustive. As a result, we need judgement, creativity and concertation when making decisions.

Collaborate on content

However, making decisions without information would be a disaster. Both judgement and creativity need food for thought. In teams, arguing for or against a decision requires arguments. Decent projections require a good understanding of what is happening around, and further afield. So, any way we look at it, good decision making processes require good information.

Content curation for decision making

In a fast-changing world, good information comes from regular monitoring of news, both of strong and weak signals. Markets disruptions can come from new entrants, from other countries, or from social evolutions. Technologies permanently evolve and affect all areas of work and life. Regulations evolve. Our world is in a constant state of flux.

Fortunately, competitive companies understand that. Now, we have a new case study explaining how such a company, a major food industry player in Canada, is using Cronycle to make better informed strategic decisions. Collective curation helps them build a global and shared perspective over external evolutions, empowers the different organizational units and, ultimately, builds synergies and collaboration.

While collective content curation increases a company’s competitive advantage, it also helps individual contributors remain up-to-date with what’s happening in the world, outside their corporation. This outward facing curiosity and awareness keeps individuals and teams agile.

Other key use cases

Beyond decision making, the other two main purposes of content curation we see from our customers are:

Visibility

This communications-oriented content curation aims to improve SEO (getting through the search engines algorithms) and thought leadership (bringing valuable content to people). It serves a variety of goals, such as brand awareness and image, attracting customers or recruits, etc. Indeed, many of our customers use Cronycle for this reason, in particular when using our WordPress plugin and sharing from Cronycle to social media.

Education

We also have customers, such as Taylor & Francis (case study here), who specialize in professional content curation for knowledge capturing and publishing. Others use it for more traditional educational purpose, with educators sharing course references with pupils (and vice versa). In both cases, the collaboration on our platform makes it particularly adapted to this kind of purpose.

While this list is not exhaustive, these three goals (decision making, visibility and education) are key reasons that bring people to the exciting world of content curation. Learn more about what Cronycle does here.