Slack-GDPR

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With the GDPR soon becoming enforceable (25th may 2018), Cronycle has launched the first-ever GDPR slack community which is aimed at building a community to foster the conversation about the General Data Protection Regulation. By joining the community, you will get content straight to your Slack channel from top influencers as well as our monthly insight reports that we produce on this topic.  You can view our latest insight for January here.

Join the community

Once you have received your invite and agreed to the Terms and conditions you can get started straight away. We have provided top articles on GDPR but also on related topics such Data Protection, Cyber Security, and Privacy. To add any of these topics, simply click on the “Channels” and you will get a pop up to browse the different channels/ topics. We’ve added a quick 20-second video to show you how.

 

 

The final part, as we are building a community we encourage that you invite fellow peers to join the community, this is an open channel so it’s as simple as “+ Invite people” at the bottom of your direct messages, fill in their email and Voila!

We value feedback so if you have any other suggestions on how we can improve the community then please drop us a message. To note, this is the start of the Communities by Cronycle, as we are looking to add more in the coming months.

GDPR: five guides for the five months to go

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The General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) kicks in on May 25th, and promise to be one of the most comprehensive shake-ups of how data is handled in history. It’s not just European companies which will be affected: anyone hoping to do business with the European Union and Britain will have to ensure that they are up to scratch. That’s a big boon for customers, who will have access over who gets access to their personal information, but a massive wall for companies who have often played it fast and loose when it comes down to security.

Our Insight piece last month picked up that guides remained the top trending terms with regards to GDPR – so for this blog , we’ve come up with some of the best writing on GDPR – for companies and for customers – showing how businesses can stay within the lines.

Europe’s data rule shake-up: How companies are dealing with it – The Financial Times

A very clear piece, with some case studies of how companies affected by GDPR will have to change their business practices to stay compliant. It also includes an important section on how GDPR shifts the barriers on the right to be forgotten. Where it used to be the responsibility of data controllers to ensure data privacy, data processors (including big companies like Microsoft and Amazon who host data for other businesses) will now be on the spot to deal with the issue: a potentially Herculean task depending on how well their data is kept.

How the EU’s latest data privacy laws impact the UK’s online universe: Tips to prepare your website for GDPR – The Drum

A great step-by-step guide to how to GDPR-proof a website, with a breakdown of potential areas where sites can fall out of compliance. It’s simple, but makes clear how easy it is to fall foul of the new laws without firm preparation.

Rights of Individuals under the GDPR – The National Law Review

A worthwhile read for both users curious about their new rights, and companies who will have to ensure that they are met to avoid hefty fines. These include the right to access any data held on them by an organisation, the right to withdraw consent at any time during the data processing or collection period, and the right to judicial remedy against data controllers and processors.

How Identity Data is turning toxic for big companies – Which 50

Less of a guide than the other pieces but a good read nonetheless for those keen to understand how the information ecology is fundamentally shifting. It points to the increasingly high number of annual breaches affecting large companies – and the fact that the fines levied against them under GDPR will make storing so much data so poorly potentially cost-ineffective.

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) FAQs for charities – Information Commissioner’s Office 

A handy piece for charities and small businesses looking to stay compliant, right from the horse’s mouth, including links to the ICO’s self-assessment page and other tools and guides to ensure that businesses don’t stray beyond the lines.

The GDPR present a challenge to existing norms, and businesses will have to step up to stay in check. But they also present an opportunity for ethical data processing, and a greater bulwark against the breaches which seem to plague the tech industry: a vital step, at a time when big tech stands on the brink of moving forwards or falling into the way of old monopolies.

What to Watch in 2018: The Biggest Tech Trends of the Year to Come

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2017 has been a tumultuous year the world over – not least in technology. Between massive hacks of public and private organisations, the death of net neutrality in America, and the massive (and temporary) upsurge in the value of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, 2018 might have a tall bill to live up to. Here are the top five predictions for big tech trends over the coming twelve months.

  1. GDPR will set in – and many companies won’t be ready

The General Data Protection Regulation of the European Union (including a post-Brexit Britain) is set to kick in on 25 May, 2018. Looking at the report with which we partnered with Right Relevance, we found that the key terms over the past month were largely focused on guides or webinars to help get compliant, or else on companies like Uber which had suffered catastrophic data l0sses due to poor security practices.

This sign of awareness is encouraging, on the one hand: the GDPR attempts to enforce strict punishments on companies which fail to protect personal data of customers, and will enact equally strict restrictions on what processing can be done with that data. At the same time, with just a matter of months to go until the law comes into effect, there’s a danger that companies underestimate how much they need to do to get compliant. Expect more than a few cases of large companies being hit by data breaches, and having to shell out a lot of money for their errors.

2. Hacking attacks will only get bigger

Ransomware attacks like WannaCry – which hit NHS Trusts, amongst other organisations – and Petya/NotPetya showed both the power of hackers (state sponsored or otherwise), and the unpreparedness of major national entities. Even ignoring the GDPR fines, the situation is grim: unless cybersecurity improves, we are likely to see threats to the national grid and other vital infrastructure.

It’s not even just the Russians who we should be worrying about (although given the probability of the second Cold War getting hotter, nothing should be ruled out): the tranches of tools released by Wikileaks dubbed Vault 7 and Vault 8 show that some very powerful weapons designed by the US government are out in the hands of anyone smart and malicious enough to use them.

3. The Cryptocurrency Bubble bursts (maybe)

Perhaps a bit of a cop-out as predictions go, but there is a strange resilience boasted by the cryptocurrency bubble (which experts have long predicted would pop before the end of the year). The abrupt falls in value have put the value of Bitcoin in flux.

There are two possibilities here: the turbulence frightens enough cryptocurrency enthusiasts that they start to sell to try and cash out, or they laugh it off in the belief that bubbles are impossible in cryptocurrencies. Either way, they’ll be confronted by the reality that fewer and fewer outlets accept blockchain based currencies. If that doesn’t change (and there are no clear reasons it will), it gives way to a third possibility: a slow and painful decline as the money of the future goes back to being a curiosity.

4. The Internet of Things will continue to expand…sometimes, too fast

The idea of an internet of things – where everything you own has a tag in it, allowing it to produce data to maximise your lifestyle – is pretty well established in theoretical circles. With Alexa, Amazon’s speakers/personal assistant, we’ve seen this sort of technology starting to make inroads into our homes.

Expect to see a massive expansion of this over the coming year. Between smart watches, shoes, clothing, water bottles, and so on, the amount of data you’ll have to plan your life will be unrivalled by any period earlier. Not that it’s unproblematic: upstart companies may not think your personal data should be as private as you do (especially if they’re quartered outside the EU). There’ll almost certainly be some consumer battles over that in the coming year.

5. Tech Giants will get into more scraps, more often

We live in strange times, where the technology companies battle over content production and distribution. That was what we saw when Google pulled YouTube from Amazon’s Fire TV devices. It’s a not so subtle reminder that whilst the two companies come from very different backgrounds, it’s digital content which they now struggle over. YouTube, once home to cat videos and amatuers, is increasingly moving towards professional content creation with its YouTube Red – the decision to remove this from Amazon is no little snub.

Then again, Amazon is hardly blameless in the debacle, having removed a number of Google products from its store – including Google Home, a rival to Alexa. Given its predominance in the market of online sales, that’s not a symbolic act of aggression. Expect to see this scuffle – and others like it – as the giants of the technology world increasingly overlap in their industries.

2017 Insights Analysis – GDPR

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After four years of preparation and debate about GDPR, the EU Parliament approved the regulation in April 2016 to replace an outdated data protection directive from 1995. Today, we have five months to go until the enforcement deadline of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018. At which, non-compliant organisations can face fines /penalties of up to €20 million or 4% of your global annual turnover, whichever is greater. Encase you are ever in doubt of the time frame, there is a live countdown timer on the EU GDPR website to remind you.

 

You may be wondering, why the regulation was agreed in the first place? There are two key takeaways as summarised by IT Pro

  • The EU wants to give people more control over how their personal data is used, bearing in mind that many companies like Facebook and Google swap access to people’s data for use of their services. The current legislation was enacted before the internet and cloud technology created new ways of exploiting data, and the GDPR seeks to address that. By strengthening data protection legislation and introducing tougher enforcement measures, the EU hopes to improve trust in the emerging digital economy.
  • Secondly, the EU wants to give businesses a simpler, clearer legal environment in which to operate, making data protection law identical throughout the single market (the EU estimates this will save businesses a collective €2.3 billion a year).

 

Our newest collaboration between Cronycle and Right Relevance means we can produce insights reports on hot topics to analyse the conversations at any point in time. As GDPR is a key focus for us (and others), we started with this and launched our report this week which you can view here.

Flock graph for GDPR Report 2017

Our report examines the all online conversations during the time period from November 15th to December 4th and along with Right Relevance topics, topical communities’ and articles data. All that data allows us to plot impressive graphs of interactions, with clear communities forming along the lines of nationality and business type. The pale blue cluster, for example, centres on the French data commissioner, CNIL: those accounts orbiting it include French firms and governmental departments.

 

Our overall findings are that the discussion about GDPR is driven by fear of failing to become compliant, across all kinds of users. Just a glance at our groupings of top trending terms can give a flavour of keywords, which focus on guides and webinars which provide clear guidance on compliance. Discussions about more the more positive side of GDPR, such as greater protection for user information or ethical innovation under the new regulations, appears to be less central at this time.

Using Right Relevance’s data, we can also produce a list of flocks: that’s those accounts which have the most influence in our specific period of research in our specific field. Rather than measuring long-term power, they’re instead a snapshot of the key players at a given moment. They included the British and French data commisioners (the ICO and CNIL), tech journalists, privacy experts like Max Schrems, and trade groups. Conspicuously missing from the table below? Members of Parliament from Britain or France, the countries from which most traffic on GDPR came.

What these flocks show is that it’s not just follower count which gives accounts importance: Laura Kayali (@LauKaya), a Brussels-based reporter, tops out our list but only has 1,524 followers compared to over 37,000 for the ICO (@ICOnews).

Our report also discusses important metrics which are often not covered elsewhere, such as betweenness centrality: how well does an account act as a node for the overall network? Whilst high page rank and betweenness centrality (being a connector here) can be interlinked, that’s not always the case: @LauKaya has a high page rank, but is not a key connector, for example.

 

Let us know if you have any thoughts or feedback as we are looking to produce a report on GDPR topic at least once a month to keep us all in the loop of conversations.

 

View the full report